September 12-16, 2010

63rd Canadian Geotechnical Conference
& 6th Canadian Permafrost Conference

Platinum Sponsors























Short Courses

Geo2010 Calgary is please to offer a number of full-day short courses as part of the official conference program. All courses will be held on Sunday, September 12 at the Hyatt Regency Calgary.

At present, two courses have been confirmed:

Details on other courses will be posted as they become available.

Introduction to Geosynthetics
Instructor: Dr. Richard Bathurst
Time: 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Cost: Before July 17 - $350 (Students $175); On/After July 17 - $400 (Students $200)

This one day short course provides an introduction to geosynthetics that are now used routinely in geotechnical and geoenvironmental engineering applications. Topics include: product types and classification, polymers, manufacturing processes, durability, test methods, service life prediction, brief outlines of methods of analysis and design for geosynthetic applications such as separation and filtration, drainage, reinforcement, erosion control and liquid/hazardous waste containment. In addition to design engineers, the course will be of interest to students and researchers, and academics developing geosynthetics courses.

Course materials will be provided in hardcopy for pre-registered attendees and online via a website with additional materials including public domain design guidance documents.

About the Instructor Richard J. Bathurst, Ph.D., P.Eng., of the GeoEngineering Centre at Queen’s-RMC in Kingston, Ontario is co-author of the first edition of the NCMA segmental wall design manual, author of the NCMA seismic design manual, and editor of the chapters on geosynthetics in the 3rd and 4th editions of the CGS Canadian Foundation Engineering Manual. Dr. Bathurst is the editor of the international journal Geosynthetics International and has authored more than 250 papers, the majority of which are related to geosynthetic reinforcement technologies. He is the recipient of many awards for his work on geosynthetic reinforced soil walls and has been an invited keynote speaker at many conferences.

Permafrost Geophysics
Instructor: Dr. Jim Henderson
Time: 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Cost: Before July 17 - $350 (Students $175); On/After July 17 - $400 (Students $200)

The presence of permafrost adds a degree of complexity to the interpretation of geophysical data. This complexity often requires a knowledge base beyond what is taught in conventional geophysics courses.

This one day short course begins with an overview of the physical properties of permafrost and how these properties contrast with those of unfrozen ground. A variety of geophysical methods are used to map permafrost including: electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, ground penetrating radar, seismic refraction, and seismic reflection. The short course will cover the basic principles of each method and through the use of case histories provide examples of their applicability and limitations.

There will be an emphasis on the geotechnical applications of permafrost geophysics covering such topics as buoyancy control, rippability, frost heave, thaw settlement, granular investigations, horizontal directional drilling, siting of facilities, contaminant mapping, and monitoring of permafrost conditions.

Attendees will be provided with detailed course notes and a comprehensive reference list.

About the Instructor
Jim Henderson, Ph.D., P.Geoph., is currently the Vice-President of Geophysical Services of Associated Geosciences Ltd. in Calgary, Alberta. He has been active in permafrost geophysics since the mid 1970’s and has authored or co-authored a number of papers on the applicability of geophysics in permafrost terrain.

Remote Sensing of Permafrost
Instructor: Prof. Claude Duguay
Time: 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Cost: Before July 17 - $350 (Students $175); On/After July 17 - $400 (Students $200)

Permafrost is difficult to map/monitor directly from remote sensing data since it is a sub-surface phenomenon. Until recently, relatively few studies have examined the potential of remote sensing techniques for mapping the spatial distribution of near-surface permafrost, the properties of the active layer and seasonally frozen ground. In addition, few studies had made use of satellite imagery to map features indicative of the presence of near-surface permafrost or of the occurrence of permafrost degradation.

Significant advancements have taken place in the last few years on at least five fronts: (1) mapping/monitoring of the evolution of permafrost-related features (e.g. thaw lakes) using archived imagery or aerial photographs and more recent high-resolution satellite imagery; (2) the application of differential interferometry from synthetic aperture radar (D-InSAR) to monitor the deformation of landscape features associated with the presence of permafrost; (3) increase use and development of new land surface “skin” temperature data products from thermal infrared and passive microwave satellite sensors to examine the impact of climate variability and change on permafrost terrain; (4) increase use and development of new land surface freeze/thaw products from both active and passive microwave satellite sensors to examine variability and trends in the onset of seasonal freezing and thawing in relation to climate; and (5) integration of land surface products derived from satellite remote sensing data in spatially-distributed permafrost models.

These recent advances as well as areas of immediate and future developments will be covered in this one-day short course. Attendees will be provided with a hardcopy of the course material and a comprehensive reference list.

About the Instructor
Claude Duguay, Ph.D., is currently a professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Management, and director of the Interdisciplinary Centre on Climate Change (IC3) at the University of Waterloo, Ontario. Prior to joining Waterloo, he held a joint faculty appointment with the Geophysical Institute and the Department of Geology & Geophysics at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. Dr. Duguay has published extensively on remote sensing and numerical modeling of the cryosphere and in northern hydrology. He is presently co-chair of the task force on remote sensing of permafrost of the International Permafrost Association (IPA) and a co-investigator of a project of the European Space Agency (ESA) aimed at developing pan-Arctic and regional scale permafrost-related products from satellite remote sensing.

Introduction to Oil Sands Tailings Planning, Production, Treatment and Reclamation
Instructors: Dr. John Sobkowicz, Jeremy Boswell and Carlo Cooper
Time: 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Cost: Before July 17 - $375 (Students $175); On/After July 17 - $425 (Students $200)

This one-day short course is aimed at recent graduates and professionals wishing to gain exposure to current geotechnical and related issues in oil sands tailings. This session is likely to attract strong industry interest, gauging from the interest in a similar topic that was the subject of a keynote address by John Sobkowicz at Tailings and Mine Waste 2009 in November 2009 in Banff.

The course will include:

  1. Background to oil sands tailings practises, nomenclature, definitions; a brief illustrated history of tailings management practises.
  2. Definition of tailings planning; integration with other disciplines; tailings properties and parameter selection.
  3. The Oil Sands Tailings Technology roadmap: how tailings are produced; properties of tailings; the ternary diagram.
  4. Current issues and challenges in oil sands tailings; ERCB Tailings Directive 074.
  5. Factors controlling tailings planning:
    • Regulatory (freeboard)
    • Operational (tailings management, contingency storage, capability of fluid transfers and available storage space, pipeline corridors and construction).
    • Engineering (stability issues - toe berm construction, pore pressure dissipation, mine plans and availability of storage space/construction material).
  6. Reclamation of oil sands tailings: tailings disposal end targets; tailings hydraulic conductivity, compressibility and consolidation.
  7. Timeframe selection; short and long range planning; safety issues, risks, operational and cost impacts; Identification of potential risks (risk based planning).

About the Instructors
The course will be presented by Dr. John Sobkowicz and Mr. Jeremy Boswell of Thurber Engineering, Calgary, and Mr. Carlo Cooper, of Wruffware Ltd, Tailings Planners.

John Sobkowicz has 35 years of geotechnical experience, the majority of which has been related to oil sands tailings. Dr. Sobkowicz is an active member of four oil sands geotechnical review boards (Syncrude, Suncor, CNRL and Shell), and has authored over 60 papers in the fields of tailings, geotechnical engineering and dam design.

Jeremy Boswell holds a Masters degree in geotechnical engineering, has 30 years of international tailings engineering and environmental management experience, and has published over 40 papers in the fields of tailings and geotechnical engineering, waste management, public participation and environmental assessment.

Carlo Cooper is an independent tailings planner based in Calgary, AB and currently works with oil sands mining companies and mining consultants across Canada. Mr. Cooper has been developing tailings plans for mine operations around the world since 2001 and has developed specialist 3D models, which he uses to simulate a wide variety of tailings types and facility configurations.



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